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Full text of "Survey of architectural and historical resources, a : report"



s 



City of Alachua 
Downtown Redevelopment District 



A Survey of 
Architectural and Historical Resources 



Report Prepared by Murray D. Laurie 
October, 1999 



■ 



City of Alachua Downtown Redevelopment District 

Survey of Architectural and Historical Resources 

Report Prepared by Murray D. Laurie 

October, 1999 



The survey of the City of Alachua Downtown Redevelopment District was made possible 
by funds provided by the City of Alachua Downtown Redevelopment Board of Trustees. The 
survey project consultant was Murray D. Laurie. 

City of Alachua: 

Mayor, Patrick Murphy 

Vice-Mayor, Orien A. Hills 

City Commission: Gerald Criswell, Gib Coerper, James A. Lewis 

City Manager, Charles M. Morris 

City Clerk, Carol Walker 

Building and Zoning Department Supervisor, Margaret Taylor 

Alachua Public Library Director, Linda Luke 

Alachua Community Redevelopment Trust Board: 

Chair, Darryl J. Tompkins 

Vice-Chair, Tom Tomberlin 

William W. Irby 

James W. Shaw 

Duane V. Helle 

Bonnie Burgess 

North Central Florida Regional Planning Council: 
Lowell Garrett, Senior Planner 
Maria Masque, Associate Planner 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 3 

SURVEY CRITERIA 4 

SURVEY METHODOLOGY 6 

THE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE CITY OF ALACHUA: 

A CHRONOLOGICAL OVERVIEW TO 1949 8 

Historical Overview 8 

Architectural Analysis 14 

RECOMMENDATIONS 31 

Specific Recommendations for the City of Alachua 32 

Incentives for Historic Preservation 36 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 39 

APPENDICES 

ONE: Inventory of Survey Sites 40 

TWO: Legal Description of the Downtown Redevelopment District 43 




Old Bank of Alachua, restored in 1998 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The assistance and cooperation of many people within the community contributed to the 
success of this survey of the historic properties in the City of Alachua Downtown 
Redevelopment District. I am most grateful for the cordial and gracious manner in which this 
assistance and cooperation was granted throughout the many months it took to complete the 
survey, which began in May, 1999. 

The financial and administrative support provided by the City of Alachua and the 
Downtown Redevelopment Board of Trustees made available the materials and services essential 
to the field survey and research process. They provided technical assistance, maps, and 
information for the properties surveyed. 

Community organizations interested in preserving the city's past, such as the Citizens for 
a Better Alachua, provided encouragement and helped me locate valuable sources of 
information. The many hours I spent talking to the residents of Alachua and its environs about 
the history of the city and its buildings were particularly enjoyable and rewarding. My warmest 
thanks are extended to Jack Bryan, David Bush, William Enneis, Kevin Finley, Mary Lois 
Forrester, Pauline Fugate, Nina May Harrison, Fletcher Stephens, and Arthur Spencer. 

The downtown merchants of Alachua have kept up the city's tradition of community 
involvement and were unfailingly helpful to me in many ways, telling me what they knew about 
the history of their building, pointing out its significant features, suggesting others to talk to, and 
sharing their hopes and plans for the future. Photographs on display in the Conestoga Restaurant 
and in the First National Bank of Alachua were a valuable resource. 

Finally, I thank the many residents and property owners who patiently answered my 
questions, permitted me to photograph their homes, and sometimes invited me in for a visit. I 
hope that this survey will encourage the continued preservation of the building fabric of the City 
of Alachua and help maintain the community's cultural heritage. 




Main Street 
3 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/surveyofarchitecOOprep 



SURVEY CRITERIA 

The criteria used to place historic properties on the National Register of Historic Places 
were used as a basis for the evaluation of the sites documented within the City of Alachua 
Downtown Redevelopment District. (See Appendix Two for boundaries and legal description of 
the District.) The survey results form an authoritatively documented foundation which can be 
used by those agencies required by law to comply with state and federal regulations in regard to 
the preservation of historic properties. The criteria for listing on the National Register as 
published by the United States Department of the Interior are listed below. 

1. A property is associated with events which have made a significant contribution to the 
broad patterns of history; or 

2. A property is associated with the lives of persons significant in the past; or 

3. A property is significant if it embodies the distinctive characteristics of a type, period, 
or method of construction, for example, it represents the work of a master, or if it possesses high 
artistic values, or if it represents a significant and distinguishable entity whose components may 
lack individual distinction, such as a district; or 

4. A property which yields, or may be likely to yield, information important in prehistory 
or history. 

In a somewhat less restricted manner the same criteria are used to select properties to be 
listed in the Florida Master Site File. Many of the properties on this master site file are of purely 
state and local significance and would not be eligible for the National Register of Historic 
Places. The Florida Site File, a central repository of archival material and data on the physical 
remains of Florida history, is a statewide inventory of buildings, structures, objects, and sites 
that can be used as a valuable planning tool. 

The survey project director, who holds a master's degree in history from the University 
of Florida and who has worked as a Historic Preservation Consultant for twenty years, examined 
all standing buildings in the City of Alachua that appeared to be at least fifty years old or older 
and recorded their location and physical description. The cut-off date of 1949 was chosen for the 
survey and, with the assistance of records in the Alachua County Tax Appraiser's office, the 
1912 and 1924 Sanborn maps of Alachua, and interviews with long-time residents of the city, 
dates of construction were verified or estimated. Some buildings that satisfied the fifty-year 
criteria but had lost the integrity of their original design through alterations and decay were 
eliminated from the survey. 

Many of the extant brick stores and commercial buildings on Main Street were built by 
1912, when the first Sanborn map was drawn, and most of the larger homes also dated from the 
turn of the century or the first decade of the twentieth century. The subsequent growth of the 
City of Alachua, according to the dates of construction of the rest of the buildings in the survey, 
was slow and gradual, with no apparent spurts of growth due to the great Florida land boom in 
the 1920s. Most of the homes built in the 1920s and 1930s were smaller wood frame residences, 
and there was little growth in the 1940s. 

As there was little recorded historical information available on individual buildings other 
than those sources mentioned, the information gathered from the citizens of the City of Alachua 
was of primary importance. Notes taken during long conversations and casual encounters alike 
helped document the intricate and fascinating historic legacy of the city's buildings. Any errors 
or omissions in reporting this information are solely the fault of the project coordinator. 




— I , jt A HCI 

T ALACHUA COUNTY 



tew n <j 



Figure 1. Location of Alachua and survey area 



SURVEY METHODOLOGY 

An historic sites survey, which may either be thematic or geographic in scope, is a 
systematic and detailed recording of historic resources. A thematic survey might, for example, 
record only resources of a predetermined type, such as farm buildings or Carpenter Gothic 
churches within a particular area. A geographic survey, on the other hand, is comprehensive and 
includes all of the historic resources within the specified area. A geographic survey of the City 
of Alachua Downtown Redevelopment District was conducted, using the boundaries indicated in 
Figure 1. The survey area extended roughly from US 441 on the north to NW 142 Avenue as the 
southern boundary, and three or four blocks to the east and west of Main Street. Archaeological 
resources were not surveyed within the area. 

The survey consisted of three phases. First, the historic literature was reviewed to 
determine the period of development for the City of Alachua and the individuals and pioneer 
families contributing to this development. An examination of the Florida Site Files for Alachua 
County revealed that no buildings within the survey area had previously been recorded. In 1973, 
a preliminary survey of historic buildings in Alachua County was conducted under the 
supervision of Professor F. Blair Reeves of the College of Architecture at the University of 
Florida, and these records, on file at the Art and Architecture Library on the UF campus, were 
examined. No buildings within the survey area are listed on the National Register of Historic 
Places, although the nearby Newnansville Cemetery is listed. The Alachua County Historical 
Commission compiled a historical walking tour map, published in 1986, that identified twenty- 
five buildings in Alachua as historically significant. Materials related to the history and 
development of the city of Alachua in the P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History at the 
University of Florida and the Alachua County Archives at the Matheson Historical Center in 
Gainesville were also examined. A search of the Map Library at the University of Florida 
yielded copies of the 1912 and 1924 Sanborn maps of Alachua. The Alachua County Office of 
Records has plat maps related to Alachua, and these were examined and some copied for 
inclusion in this report. The State of Florida Photo Archive was also consulted. 

Field work is the second step of the historic site survey. A pedestrian survey of the entire 
area was conducted by the consultant to determine which structures built before 1949 were still 
intact. Each likely site was photographed and site data was recorded on a field form. Dates were 
confirmed, as nearly as possible by interviewing property owners and long-time residents and by 
reviewing property tax rolls. The ownership of stores and the merchandise and services they 
offered changed over the years, and with few written records, the history of Alachua commerce 
is fragmented and somewhat kaleidoscopic. 

A large map of the survey area with tax numbers recorded for each lot facilitated a 
computer search of these records at the Alachua County Tax Appraisers office. A map location 
of each site and a thumbnail sketch were also recorded on each field form. In all, 120 sites were 
determined to meet the survey criteria, and site file numbers were obtained from the Bureau of 
Historic Preservation to be assigned to each historic structure. All pertinent information was 
entered on computer for each site and disks including all 120 forms will be sent to the Florida 
Site File along with files containing hard copies, maps, and photographs. Copies will be made 
of the computerized data as well as the hard copy forms for the City of Alachua. 



Finally, the analysis of the properties recorded during the survey was completed and 
recommendations were made for future action. This final survey report, which includes a 
chronological overview and an architectural description of the sites, will be made available to 
the public through the City of Alachua Downtown Redevelopment Board of Trustees. 




Figure 2. USGS Map, Alachua Quadrangle, 1966, Revised 1993 
City of Alachua Downtown Redevelopment District 



THE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE CITY OF ALACHUA: 
A CHRONOLOGICAL OVERVIEW TO 1949 

Historical Overview 

The area which encompasses the city of Alachua, located in the northwest quadrant of 
Alachua County, is characterized by a gently rolling landscape with a few lakes and sinkholes, 
bounded on its north border by the Santa Fe River. Once densely covered by forests of yellow 
pine, oak hammocks, and giant cypress trees, most of the land has been cleared for agriculture. 
The boundaries of the city have been expanded in recent years to more than forty square miles, 
but the highest concentration of buildings is within the fifty-block survey area, downtown 
Alachua, which is about Fifteen miles northwest of Gainesville, the county seat and largest city 
in Alachua County. 

Prior to the discovery of Florida by the first Europeans to reach the peninsula early in the 
sixteenth century, the area which now comprises Alachua County was occupied by a succession 
of native peoples. The Potano, a branch of the Timucuan nation, resided in the vicinity when the 
Spanish legions led by Hernando de Soto marched through the land in 1539. The Spaniards 
passed near the future site of the City of Alachua as they crossed the Santa Fe River at the 
natural land bridge, created as the river goes underground for three miles, a useful natural 
phenomenon now encompassed within the boundaries of the O'Leno State Park, about ten miles 
northwest of Alachua. Later, as the Spaniards built cities on the coasts at St. Augustine and 
Pensacola and sent missionaries to the interior of La Florida to convert and control the native 
peoples, several missions were established in what is now Alachua County, although none within 
the survey area. These mission sites have been extensively studied and archaeological findings 
published in a number of works. Dr. Jerald Milanich of the University of Florida, for example, 
has done extensive research on Potano village sites and Spanish missions in this part of the 
county. 1 

With the destruction of the La Florida mission system by English raids early in the 
seventeenth century, the land remained relatively empty of human habitation and use until 
remnants of the Creek nations to the north, called Seminoles, moved into north Florida, but little 
is known of Seminole settlements within the survey area. When Florida became a United States 
territory, white settlers from states north of the border also began to claim land in the 1820s. The 
Bellamy Road, authorized by Congress in 1824 as the first federal highway project in Florida, 
passed near this area as it stretched from St. Augustine to Pensacola. The Bellamy Road, which 
closely followed the pathways created by the early native peoples and the Spanish who ruled 
Florida for more than three centuries, crossed the Santa Fe River over the natural land bridge 
and linked the remote inland heart of Florida to both the Gulf and Atlantic coasts. 

Among the local pioneers of the territorial period were members of the Dell family. The 
first settlement, located about a mile northeast of the present site of the City of Alachua, was 
called Dell's Court House, established as a post office in 1831. The name was soon changed to 
Newnansville in 1837, in honor of Indian fighter Daniel Newnan, under whom three of the Dell 
brothers had served. The history of Newnansville, which became the first county seat of Alachua 
County, has been extensively researched, and the Newnansville cemetery is listed on the 
National Register of Historic Places. The frontier village, located at the junction of the east- west 
Bellamy Road and the north-south road between Lake City and Micanopy, became a military 
post and a refuge for scattered farm families when their lives were threatened by roaming 



Indians during the Seminole Wars in the 1830s and early 1840s. When the Seminoles had been 
pushed south and peace once more came to the area, more settlers poured into Florida, and 
Newnansville, as the county seat, became a busy center of business and politics. Many of the 
early land grants were recorded in the wood frame courthouse. The Methodist congregation 
outgrew its log cabin and built a new church with a steeple and classical facade in the 1850s. 
The town cemetery was laid out beside this church. The rich soil, gentle climate and other 
natural advantages drew cotton planters as well as small farmers, and agricultural pursuits 
flourished. 2 

Newnansville would no doubt have continued to grow had it not been for the routing of 
the Florida Railroad many miles to the south as it linked the state's coasts, running from 
Fernandina on the Atlantic to Cedar Key on the Gulf of Mexico. Bypassed by the cross-state 
railroad, Newnansville lost out to the new town of Gainesville, created about fifteen miles to the 
south in the 1850s, which became the new seat of government for Alachua County in 1854. 

Webber's 1883 book, "Eden of the South," characterizes Newnansville and its environs 
as "the most fertile portion of the county . . . [and] one of the greatest timber regions in the 
State," although somewhat isolated by lack of railroad connections. The old courthouse was 
then in use mainly as a Masonic Temple, and only a handful of stores were open along Main 
Street. But at least a thousand bags of Sea Island cotton were produced annually in the precinct 
by white and black farmers, who were prudently beginning to turn their attention to fruit and 
vegetable crops as well. 3 

With the loss of its status as the county seat, Newnansville was further diminished in the 
early 1880s when the Savannah, Florida and Western Railroad's tracks were laid a mile and a 
half to the south. The SF&W depot (located near the present site of the First National Bank of 
Alachua) became a magnet for commerce in the area, and farmers were drawn there to sell their 
crops or ship them to far-off markets. Gradually the businesses in Newnansville moved to the 
new town of Alachua, pronounced A-l£-chu-way. The Newnansville post office was 
discontinued and re-established at Alachua in 1887, an official signal that the new town had 
replaced the old one. 4 

Streets were laid out (but not paved for many years) and lots were platted in Alachua. 
The first eight-block plat was recorded in 1887, railroad engineer George Tompsett set out 
streets much as they are today in 1897, and Clarks Second Addition was recorded in 1915 
(Figures 3 & 4 ). Other small platted sections of the town were recorded in the Alachua County 
courthouse in the following decades. The first school house was built on Main Street (on the site 
of the present AllTel building) and the Methodists and Baptists held their first church services in 
this building. In 1897 the Methodists built a new church on the site of the present building, and 
in the 1 890s a new brick school building was constructed in Alachua on a four- acre plot of land 
north of the business district, the site of the present Alachua Elementary School. 



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Figure 3. 1896 plat of Alachua by George Tompsett 
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Figure 4. Clarks 2nd Addition to Alachua, 1915 



11 



To accommodate a growing population and the expanding economy, many homes and 
stores were constructed in Alachua in the 1880s and 1890s, and the new century saw a brisk 
continuation of progress and development. This shift in population doomed Newnansville to its 
current status as one of the "Ghost Towns of Alachua County," with only the old cemetery to 
mark its past. Nevertheless, many of the pioneer families in Alachua can trace ancestors back to 
Newnansville and they cherish the heritage of the former county seat and its interesting past. 

In 1890 the Gainesville Daily Sun reported that Mrs. Bart Stephens was opening a 
millinery store, T. H. Cato had moved his beef market from Newnansville to Alachua, and F. E. 
Williams was rebuilding his hotel, the Williams House. By 1903 other railroads, the Jacksonville 
and Southwestern and the Atlantic Coast Line (which had absorbed the SF&W), had established 
depots. Mizell and Williams had installed a new gasoline engine in their cotton gin by 1905, and 
the Alachua Telephone Company had a direct line to Gainesville. 5 Growing cotton was the main 
occupation in the agrarian community, and the town now had a weekly newspaper, two 
physicians and three druggists, a Baptist and a Methodist church, a public school, and three 
hotels. At least a dozen merchants erected fine brick stores, most with decorative brickwork 
adorning their handsome parapets and elegantly arched doors and windows with more brickwork 
elaborations. Similar brickwork can be seen on extant buildings constructed at about the same 
time in the nearby towns of High Springs and Newberry. (One of the master masons may have 
been J. T. Mizell, who built the Methodist Church in 1912.) 

The merchants of Alachua built fine homes for their families close to their stores, 
proudly advertising their success and prosperity, and establishing their role as community 
leaders. The mix of solid brick stores and attractive residences along Main Street that is the 
legacy of these pioneer merchants is one of the most delightful impressions of the historic heart 
of the city. 

In April of 1905 Alachua was incorporated. That same year the Gainesville Daily Sun 
reported that the Diamond Ice Company planned to build a plant with a twenty-ton capacity in 
Alachua, and the Bank of Alachua had erected a handsome new fireproof building. C. A. 
Williams, a pioneer merchant, sold his dry goods business to Mrs. M. L Maynard and her sons, 
John and William Jones, and Walter H. Sealey purchased the Cable and May Racket Store. 
Two years later the First National Bank opened on Main Street with $25,000 in capital stock. Its 
founders. Dr. J. C. Bishop, T. W. Shands, C. A. Williams, S. J. Ellis, E. E. Bell, and J. W. 
Roberts, were placing their faith in the continued prosperity of the town, which was still heavily 
dependent on the local Sea Island cotton crop. Two miles of granolithic sidewalk eight feet in 
width were installed along Main Street in 1912 and a new Methodist Church, to replace the one 
that had burned in 1910, was completed. The town now had a population of more than a 
thousand. More progress in the form of a city-owned electric plant and water works came to 
Alachua in 1913, and Mr. E. S. Pierce lost little time wiring homes and businesses. Proceeds 
from these utilities would form the financial base of the City of Alachua government for many 
years. 6 

The buildings shown on the 1912 and 1924 Sanborn maps, old photographs, business 
directories, and interviews with local historians reveal the details of life in this vital small city 
serving the surrounding farming communities. There were several cotton gins processing the 
valuable cash crop (running night and day to keep up with the inflow of cotton), packing sheds 
where produce was boxed and crated for shipment, several sawmills and a grist mill, three 
railroad depots to serve the three railroad lines that passed through town, an unpaved but tree- 



12 



shaded Main Street, brick stores offering a variety of merchandise, four churches, a cluster of 
brick school buildings, an ice plant and cold storage facility, and several small hotels. There was 
a pool hall, but no saloons. 

Alachua was not a tourist town, but on Saturday, when the farm families came to town to 
sell their crops and to shop, the tempo of life picked up and traffic swelled as wagons and trucks 
lined up at the packing houses and cotton gins, lines lengthened at the two banks and the barber 
shops, porches were crowded with visiting friends and relatives, and cash drawers filled up in all 
the general stores and shops along Main Street. The links between town and country went both 
ways: some well-to-do farmers maintained houses in town, the town doctor tended his patients 
throughout the countryside, and the two car dealers sent salesmen out to the farmlands to 
demonstrate the superiority of their Chevrolet sedans, Fordson tractors, Model-Ts, or Lincoln 
Zephyrs. While the younger set might have enjoyed movies in town or cherry cokes at the soda 
fountain in Joiner's Drug Store, they also flocked out to Pinkoson Springs or Burnett's Lake for 
picnics and swimming parties. 7 

The devastation caused by the infestation of the cotton crop by the boll weevil around 
1919-1920 proved the wisdom of diversified farming, but many small farmers, black and white, 
lost their farms and either went to work for others or moved away. Those who planted 
vegetables or raised hogs, chickens, and cattle survived, and the value of farm land increased. 
Tobacco was first planted in the mid- 1920s and became an important cash crop. 8 The general 
population did not rise in the 1920s and few new homes were built, but stores in town continued 
to do a steady, if modest, business. 

Alachua weathered the depression years better than many other parts of Florida, which 
were affected by the collapse of the real estate boom. In 1930, a large packing shed, 60 x 300 
feet, was built to handle the cucumber, corn, lettuce, watermelons and other crops produced on 
local farms. As many as sixty to seventy people were employed at this facility, which acted also 
to assure quality control. (Located behind the police station, it has been enclosed and is used for 
storage.) The Bank of Alachua closed in January of 1931, never to reopen, but astute 
management kept the First National Bank in business. 9 It moved in 1975 from its Main Street 
location to a larger bank building a block away, where it continues to serve the community. 
When W. F. Duke's lumber mill burned in 1931, the company relocated on a site just east of 
town. Ford dealer William Enneis catered to the motorists driving through Alachua on the Dixie 
Highway by installing two gasoline pumps and offering auto repairs and service (Figure 5). 
Several other service stations appeared, replacing community landmarks such as Mr. Barnett's 
livery stable behind the bank and Mr. Mott's blacksmith shop. The Lions Club, which still 
flourishes, was organized in July of 1931 to carry out civic betterment projects. Reverend J. H. 
Copeland, Church of Christ minister and one of the founders of Copeland Sausage Company, 
was the first president. The establishment of the Copeland brothers' sausage factory in Alachua 
in the mid- 1920s was a big boon to the local economy. It employed hundreds of people in the 
plant, supported local farmers who raised the hogs, and quickly grew into a successful statewide 
operation. 10 

Federal relief funds brought some road improvements during the Depression years, and 
the Alachua Womans Club building was constructed in 1938 with the aid of the WPA, both 
projects providing jobs for unemployed men. FERA funds also contributed to the new eight- 
room brick school building that opened in 1935. 

The 1940s, the World War II years, brought prosperity and higher prices for agricultural 



13 



products. In addition, good paying jobs became available at Camp Blanding located at Starke in 
Bradford County. There were few houses or stores built during the war years due to shortage of 
materials. Just as Alachua escaped the building boom of the 1930s, so did it escape the post-war 
building boom. Many men who had joined the service did not return to Alachua after the war; 
farming had lost its luster as new jobs opened up elsewhere. The end of the railroad era brought 
an increase in highway traffic, By the 1940s traffic on the Dixie Highway down Alachua's Main 
Street shifted to US 441, which bypassed the old downtown shopping center. When Interstate 75 
was built in the 1960s west of downtown, it also had an impact on Alachua, making it easier for 
people to drive to Gainesville to shop. Modern industrial plants and shopping and service centers 
have been established in Alachua in recent decades but not within the survey area, which adds to 
the tax base and provides jobs without impacting the concentration of the city's historic 
buildings. Stores along old Main Street, which struggled for several decades and became a 
somewhat blighted area, now do a brisk business. A new generation of entrepreneurs have 
renovated and rehabilitated the older commercial buildings to serve the current needs of the 
community. 

The fifty-block survey area has been buffered from the impact of subdivisions and 
national franchise stores and has retained its small-town scale and ambiance. Its historic 
buildings- homes, stores, and churches-are enduring containers of memory, meaning, and 
experience that deserve preservation and protection. 

Architectural Analysis 

The historic architectural resources of Alachua make up a small percentage of the total 
buildings within the city limits. Based on survey criteria and the geographical boundaries of the 
Downtown Redevelopment District, a total of 1 20 buildings were identified as contributing to 
the historic fabric of the area. Those buildings are the product of the late-nineteenth and early- 
twentieth centuries and are closely associated with the development of north central Florida and 
Alachua County. The majority of the buildings exhibit vernacular designs, although a 
significant percentage were classified as representing various identifiable architectural styles. 
Most were built as single family residences, with commercial, religious, and clubhouse being the 
only other historic functions evident in the community. 

To form a background for the built environment, a brief description of the present and 
original physical appearance of the survey area is in order. Alachua has historically been 
associated with agricultural pursuits and its location was determined not by natural features, but 
by the establishment of the Savannah, Florida and Western Railroad line which built the first of 
three depots in Alachua in the early 1880s. Like the surrounding land, the site of the new town, 
which had formerly been known as Williams Hammock, was relatively flat with some gentle 
hills. There are no lakes or other bodies of water within the survey area, but two small sinkholes 
were observed. Streets were laid out in a north-south grid with East Main Street and West Main 
Street running parallel to one another. Broad Street, which was later called Church Street, was 
the other main north-south avenue. The east-west streets were numbered. Although streets were 
not paved for many years, some improvements to sidewalks were made early in the century in 
the business district on East Main Street. 

Some homes and shops were built in the last years of the nineteenth century, but the 
greatest boom in building took place in Alachua in the first two decades of the twentieth century. 
There were several sawmills in town, and other buildings supplies for the brick stores and frame 



14 



homes could be brought in by rail. Two more railroads passed through Alachua, several blocks 
south of the SF&W line, which had become part of the Plant System. 

Other than the buildings, these railroads and the highways that connected Alachua to the 
surrounding communities and to the larger world are the most significant man-made features in 
Alachua. Only one of the rail lines is still in use at present, but trains no longer stop in 
downtown Alachua. The last depot was removed in the 1950s. Main Street, which used to be 
part of the Dixie Highway system which ran all the way down to Miami, is now used only for 
local traffic. Broad or Church Street, now NW 140 Street, is County Road 235, a rather busy 
highway that divides south of town leading to Gainesville and to Newberry. US 441, which 
parallels the old SF&W tracks, is a major divided highway connecting Alachua to High Springs 
and to Gainesville. Many new businesses were built on this corridor. In the 1960s, an interstate 
highway was built just west of Alachua, passing through what was open farmland. The Alachua 
exit on Interstate 75 sprouted a cluster of hotels, restaurants, service stations, and other 
businesses in the ensuing decades. Because of its favorable location, Alachua has attracted a 
number of large industrial plants and research complexes to its open spaces, many of which are 
within the larger city limits. 

Until the 1980s, there was little effort to landscape the downtown district. Now a curving 
street with lush pear trees, brick crosswalks, and other urban amenities marks a section of Main 
Street, with plans to extend these improvements in the near future. There is no landscaping on 
NW 140 Street, but there are sidewalks on either side of this wide thoroughfare. The residential 
streets are paved, but do not have curbs or sidewalks. Skinner Park, with tennis, basketball, 
baseball and soccer facilities, is also the site of the Lions Club and a Scout Hut. The City of 
Alachua has received a $100,000 grant to renovate Skinner Park. Another recreational facility is 
located west of the survey area in the Rolling Green area. A new county library has opened on 
NW 140 Street, adjacent to the City Hall. 

There is little intrusion into the historic character of Main Street between NW 150 
Avenue and NW 145 Avenue. The north end of the Main Street is marked by commercial 
development along US 441, a large parking lot, and little attention to aesthetics. The older and 
newer homes in the residential neighborhoods blend in a harmonious way, with no sharp 
contrasts. Most homes less than fifty years old were built as infill rather than as a result of 
intense development. Very few homes in truly dilapidated condition were observed, and there 
were encouraging signs of home improvement and rehabilitation of historic houses. 

A building that is in either good or excellent condition is more apt to be given 
consideration for listing in the National Register of Historic Places than one that is in fair or 
deteriorated condition. Alachua's historic building stock was found to possess a significant 
degree of integrity. The majority of buildings included in the survey still serve their original 
function. While some of the buildings that originally served as residential structures have been 
converted to use as offices or other commercial uses, their adaptive use has retained the basic 
integrity of their original appearance. 

The historic buildings in the survey area represent an important cluster of cultural 
resources that exhibit a wide range of forms and several architectural styles. Most were 
designed and constructed by builders who drew upon traditional buildings techniques and 
contemporary stylistic preferences for their inspirations and were primarily concerned with 
providing functional spaces for their clients. 



15 



Residential Buildings 

The Frame Vernacular is the dominant style for houses in Alachua, a style based on 
tradition rather than architectural form. Builders and carpenters, many of them self-taught, often 
constructed Frame Vernacular buildings from memory, using available resources that were 
affordable and familiar to the community. Frame Vernacular buildings did not represent major 
stylistic trends, but sometimes components of "high style" were applied to facades or porches. 
In Alachua, like elsewhere in Florida, Frame Vernacular houses were one or two stories in 
height, constructed of the plentiful native yellow pine using the balloon frame structural system. 
This popular building technology adapts readily to additions and alterations as a family grows, 
needs a larger kitchen, builds an indoor bathroom, accommodates an aging parent, or adds 
central heat or air conditioning. The structures are mounted on masonry piers, mostly of brick, 
and have a single front or side gable or intersecting and cross gable roofs. Horizontal drop 
siding or weatherboard are the most widely used exterior wall surface, and roofing materials 
may be composition shingles or the more traditional standing seam metal roofing. Some 
resemble the farmhouses that dot the countryside (Figure 5), others are simple cottages for the 
working man (Figure 6). E. E. Bell, a local builder and contractor whose skill is 
shown in the quality of his own home ( Figure 7), was a master of the Frame Vernacular 
style. 




Figure 5. Dell-Dansby House, 14810 NW 144 Street 
16 




Figure 6. 14412 NW 144 Place 




Figure 7. Bell House, 14707 ' NW 140 Street 



17 



The Queen Anne was one of the most popular residential styles in the United States 
between 1880 and 1910. This most elaborate house type is represented in Alachua by such 
examples as the Williams-LeRoy house, the Pierce-Bishop house, and the Mizell-Stephens house 
on Main Street. Here we see the steeply pitched, irregularly shaped roof lines and asymmetrical 
facades, as well as the free use of bay windows, patterned shingles, turned balusters, and 
decorative woodwork that mark this late Victorian era style made popular by English architects 
and inappropriately named for the early seventeenth-century British monarch. 11 The Williams- 
LeRoy house (Figure 8) is complete with an elaborate tower, and the Pierce-Bishop house is 
embellished with a gazebo with a conical roof on one corner of the front verandah (Figure 9). 
The Mizell-Stephens house (Figure 10) has a classical portico as a focal point for its broad, 
wraparound porch. The interior details of woodwork, fireplace surrounds and mantles, and the 
generous size of the rooms in these homes are in keeping with the elaborations on the exterior. 
Other houses in Alachua are more modestly defined by this exuberant style, with gingerbread 
trim, bay windows, brackets on porches, or cut shingles in the front gable. 




Figure 8. Williams-LeRoy House, 14603 Main Street 



18 




Figure 9. Pierce-Bishop House, 14713 Main Street 




Figure 10. Mizell-Stevhens House, 14705 Main Street 



19 



The more symmetrical Colonial Revival style, which drew its inspiration from a rebirth 
of interest in the early English and Dutch houses built during the nation's colonial period, is 
represented by larger homes such as the Williams-Harrison house (Figure 11) and the Enneis 
house (Figure 12) with their classical, formal entrances and balanced windows. Several smaller 
homes with these characteristics indicate the enduring popularity of this style. 

The Craftsman Bungalow , introduced in this country in the 1890s by California 
architects, found a ready market in Florida early in the twentieth century. Its low-pitched roof, 
wide unenclosed eaves, often accented with knee brackets, and thick sloping porch columns set 
on brick piers were in marked contrast to older styles and gave builders and homeowners a fresh 
new look at a modest price. Most were unpretentious and in harmony with any landscape or site 
size. The porch was an integral part of the Bungalow design, and with the increasingly important 
role of the automobile in domestic life, the carport became an element of the house design rather 
than an afterthought. Bungalow plans appeared in newspapers, magazines, and pattern books, 
and the popular house could even be ordered in pre-fabricated packages. 12 A Bungalow could be 
large, such as the David Waters house (Figure 13), or more modest in size such as the Carl 
Williams house (Figure 14). The Hague house (Figure 15 ) is good illustration of the use of 
natural materials, another Craftsman touch, in this case the local limestone is used to good 
advantage. Smaller wood frame Bungalows (Figure 16) reveal the versatility and flexibility of 
this informal and practical style. 

On most of the houses in Alachua, the open front porch is still the norm. Some have 
been enclosed or screened, but this inviting feature has endured longer than in many older 
neighborhoods. Porches serve an important function in creating a feeling of welcome and, at the 
same time, separation from the world outside. The expansive wraparound verandahs of the larger 
homes (Figure 17), the smaller porch tucked in the ell of a roof (Figure 18), the tiny portico 
sheltering a front entrance— all these add distinction to the homes of Alachua. 

In most of the yards, garages and storage sheds in a variety of materials were noted. A 
few homes have swimming pools, while some still have old barns which might once have 
sheltered a horse or a cow. Early in the century people kept domestic animals in their yards, 
which were sure to be fenced. Fencing, in a variety of materials, can still be seen, but it is more 
likely to enclose side and rear yards and be used for privacy, rather than to exclude roaming 
livestock. 

There are very few vacant lots within the survey area, but a number of homes are on 
large parcels that take up as much as half a block. Landscaping is varied and informal, with 
many large shade trees-oak, pine, hickory, magnolia, pecan, and other native species. All streets 
within the survey area are paved with asphalt. The only paved sidewalks are along Main Street 
and NW 140 Street. Noncontributing houses, those built after 1950, are in scale with the older 
houses and have the same setbacks (Figures 19 & 20). 



20 







Figure 11. Williams-Harrison House, 14209 XIV 148 Place 




Figure 12. Enneis House, 14603 NW 144 Street 



21 




Figure 13. David Waters House, 14617 Main Street 




Figure 14. Carl Williams House, 14801 NW 142 Terrace 



22 



'-, 




figure 15. E. D. Hague House, 14722 Nl¥ 142 Terrace 




Figure 16. 14412 NiV 145 Avenue 
23 




Figure 1 7. 14804 NW 140 Street 




Figure 18. 14109 NW 146 Avenue 

24 




Figure 19. Noncontj-ihuling Residence, 14218 NW 145 Avenue 




Figure 20. Noncontributing Residence, 14307 NW 147 Avenue 



25 



Commercial Buildings 

Most of the extant older commercial buildings in Alachua are of brick, with two built of 
rusticated cast concrete block (the Bank of Alachua and the old garage on the comer of Main 
Street and NW 150 Avenue). These masonry vernacular structures are rectangular in shape and 
face Main Street with no setbacks (Figure 21). Old photographs indicate that most had awnings 
over the sidewalks, and this is still the case. There are several blocks of buildings where 
common walls are shared and where there is evidence of connecting doorways between stores. 
Two of the stores, Harvest Thyme Cafe (Figure 22) and Garden Gazebo have decorative cast 
iron pilasters incorporated into the design of the front facade. Roof lines and flat parapets of the 
historic stores in Alachua are distinguished by richly textured brickwork in a variety of patterns, 
many in excellent condition. Arched and rounded windows and doorways with basket-handle 
detailing, recessed panels, and denticulated cornices add interest and dimension. (Figure 23). In 
recent years, decorative canvas awnings have been installed by some store owners. On Main 
Street, there are three contributing two-story commercial buildings and about twenty-five one- 
story structures. The Enneis Motor Company, located south of the railroad tracks was built 
originally as a cotton warehouse, converted to a Ford agency and service center by William 
Enneis in 1925 (Figure 24). Two frame buildings covered with corrugated metal (a former 
machine shop and a dry cleaners) are all that remain of this type of structure. None of the 
original railroad depots, which existed mostly for the benefit of agricultural activities, are extant. 

Most of the noncontributing stores and business buildings observed during the survey, 
those built after 1949, are concentrated along US 441, but those few newer commercial 
structures on Main Street generally respect the scale and texture of the historic district (Figure 
25). 



&S&. 




Figure 21. Oldest stores, 14925 & 14933 Main Street 
26 




Figure 22. Stringfellow Building (Harvest Thyme Cafe), 14822 Main Street 




Figure 23. Sealey, Eddy, and Williams Stores, South Main Street 



27 




24. Enneis Motor Company, 14320 Main Street 




Figure 25. Noncontributing commercial building, Main Street 



28 



Alachua Churches and Clubhouses 

There are two historic churches in the survey area, the Methodist Church, built in 1912, 
whose congregation dates its founding to the 1820s in Newnansville, and the Church of Christ, 
built in 1921. The Methodist Church, built by J. T. Mizell, has a Gothic tower with crenelated 
roof line and rounded Romanesque windows inset with very fine stained glass windows (Figure 
26). The fellowship hall and educational buildings, built in recent years, are set back on the site 
and do not intrude on the impact or historical character of this impressive house of worship. 

The Church of Christ, stuccoed on its older section, has a 1934 addition of rusticated 
block. This popular and durable building material was widely used throughout Florida as it could 
be made on the site, using concrete poured into molds (Figure 27). 

Alachua has several buildings within the survey area devoted to meeting places for 
organizations. The most prominent is the Alachua Womans Club. The Womans Club was 
founded in 1912 to work for the benefit of the Alachua School. Members met in homes or 
church buildings until 1938 when, thanks to federal funds made available during the Depression, 
a beautiful clubhouse was built of native limestone on land owned by the club on Main Street 
(Figure 28). It is almost certain that Gainesville architect Sanford Goin was the architect, for he 
designed a very similar stone building in Newberry during this same time period. The triple 
arched facade, fine detailing inside and out, superior masonry work, and excellent proportions of 
this building are noteworthy. Many important community events have taken place in this 
building, including the annual cattlemen's banquet, sponsored by the Lions Club and catered by 
the members of the Womans Club. 

Masonic Lodge #26 meets on the second floor of the historic Williams Building (Figure 
23), and down Main Street, south of the railroad tracks, is the home of VFW Post 9229, which 
holds regular bingo games in their small clubhouse, once a tearoom. 




Figure 26. Alachua United Methodist Church, 14805 NW 140 Street 



29 




Figure 27. Church of Christ, 14421 NW 145 Avenue 




Figure 28. Alachua Womans Club, 14565 Mam Street 



30 



RECOMMENDATIONS 

The indispensable preliminary step in the City of Alachua's preservation program has 
been taken with the completion of this historic properties survey. Once the survey of historic 
resources has been completed and the overview of the city's history has been recorded, the 
information that has been gathered can be used in the planning and decision making process. 
Because historic resources are irreplaceable, it is imperative that the City of Alachua consider its 
natural resources and historic properties in all land use considerations. In addition to 
government action, citizen and community support is vital. The interest and cooperation of all 
segments of the community encountered during the process of this survey indicate that there are 
many supporters for the protection and preservation of the historic buildings of Alachua. 

There are three main reasons to support historic preservation, and they set forward a 
persuasive case which should be understood and appreciated by the citizens of Alachua: 

• Tradition, or the maintenance of a community's sense of time and place, is important for 
citizens of all ages. Promoting the unique history and heritage of Alachua through the 
remaining built environment will help clarify and strengthen the traditions that are part of 
the community. Pioneer families are recognized, young people of the community have a 
better understanding of local history, and newcomers are made aware of the community's 
roots through its historic structures. Recognizing the past helps the Alachuans of the 
present understand what sets this city apart from other towns, cities, and neighborhoods. 
In this modern era of franchised architecture, many parts of Florida have become 
indistinguishable one from another. Preserving familiar surroundings contributes to the 
sense of continuity in community. 

• Aesthetics are enhanced throughout the City of Alachua as historic structures and 
streetscapes are maintained, older buildings are restored, and neighborhoods continue to 
be desirable and attractive places to live. Design guidelines help reinforce the 
architectural gifts of the past, and beautification projects, such as the creation of a park 
within the shell of the old movie theater, encourage other property owners to value and 
restore landmark buildings by respecting older building styles and traditions. 
Improvements of streetscapes, distinctive signage in the commercial area, and an active 
appreciation for local styles and architectural features already fortify the efforts made to 
improve the aesthetic appeal and harmony of Alachua's Main Street. 

• Economics is a driving force in our society, and the preservation of historic buildings in 
the City of Alachua pays off for property owners and the entire community in a number 
of ways. Federal tax benefits provide incentives to owners who restore older income- 
producing buildings according to the standards set by the Secretary of the Interior, and 
real estate values of well maintained and properly restored and renovated heritage homes 
and stores continue to rise. The State of Florida has passed enabling legislation 
permitting local governments to offer ad valorem tax relief for residential property if 
they so choose. Certain grant funds are available to government agencies and nonprofit 
organizations for a variety of historic preservation projects through the Bureau of 
Historic Preservation. Economic benefits also arise because of jobs created in the local 
construction industry and the jobs that result when rehabilitated buildings are put back in 



31 



use, adding to the local tax base. In addition, the special appeal that historic buildings 
create for tourists and out-of-town visitors, as well as individuals and businesses 
considering settling in or near the City of Alachua, is a valuable promotional asset. 

Specific Recommendations for the City of Alachua 

Recognition of Historic Properties 

The next step in historic preservation is the formal recognition of historic properties at 
the Federal and local level. The National Register of Historic Places, maintained by the US 
Department of the Interior, in addition to listing individual buildings, sites, and structures, also 
lists historic districts. This listing is essentially honorary and provides no protection for 
properties, nor does it restrict a property owner's ability to alter the structure in any way. The 
only exception is in the case of federal funds or activities that might impact the property, 
whereupon a review process is required before federal funds can be used. Listing of a 
commercial property as a contributing structure within a historic district makes the owner 
eligible for the Tax Rehabilitation Credit offered by the Federal government. I strongly 
recommend that a historic district be nominated. The recommended boundaries of the historic 
district, where the greatest concentration of significant and contributing resources exists, are 
indicated in Figure 29. The City of Alachua historic district possesses a signficant concentration 
of structures united hitoricaily and aesthetically by their physical development. The material 
gathered during this survey will support the documentation necessary to prepare a nomination 
proposal. 

Expanded Survey of Historic and Archaeological Resources 

This report, with its accompanying Florida Site File forms, completes the survey of the 
City of Alachua Downtown Redevelopment District. In total, 120 forms were completed for 
properties built before 1949. These forms and the survey report should be retained by the 
Downtown Redevelopment Council and the City of Alachua Planning and Zoning Department to 
be used as a basis for making decisions concerning historic preservation in this area. The survey 
area comprised an area of approximately fifty city blocks. 

As the total area of the City of Alachua is more than forty square miles, I recommend 
that a second phase be undertaken to survey the historic resources in the rest of Alachua. A 
number of buildings that would have met the survey criteria were observed in adjacent streets 
and neighborhoods not included within the boundaries of the Downtown Redevelopment 
District, and many more can be found in rural parts of Alachua. As most of the sites included in 
the survey area were those of white property owners, the rich history of the African American 
community of Alachua and the buildings associated with its neighborhoods and institutions have 
yet to be documented. It is also highly likely that important archaeological sites may be found in 
the surrounding area as evidenced by past archaeological investigations. A search of the Florida 
Site Files revealed sites already recorded (Figure 30). Grant funds that could be matched by the 
City of Alachua are available from the Bureau of Historic Preservation, Florida Department of 
State, for historic resource and archaeological surveys. The application and instructions, 
including deadlines, may be downloaded as a Microsoft Word for Windows file. The address is 
http://dhr.dos. state, fl.us/bhp/grants/grantapp.html. 



32 




Figure 29. Survey area and suggested Historic District boundaries 



33 




# 


SITE NAME 


TYPE 


STATUS 


1 


NN 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 


2 


NN 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 


3 


PECAN BRANCH FIELD 


UNKNOWN 


NEW 


4 


NN 


HISTORIC 


NEW 


5 


BURNETTS LAKE 


PREHISTORIC/HISTORIC 


NEW 


6 


ALACHUA FIELD 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 


7 


NN 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 


8 


NN 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 


9 


FLINT SINK 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 


10 


BEVERLY HILLS 


UNKNOWN 


NEW 


11 


NN 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 


12 


MINERAL SPRINGS 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 




NN 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 


13 


NN 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 




NN 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 


14 


NN 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 




NN 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 




NN 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 




NN 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 




HARG RAVES 


ARCHAIC/PREHISTORIC 


NEW 


15 


CELLON FENCE LINE 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 




CELLON 


ARCHAIC 


NEW 




NN 


ARCHAIC 


NEW 




TWIN PONDS SITE 


UNKNOWN 


NEW 


16 


NN 


ARCHAIC 


NEW 


17 


NN 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 


18 


SAN FELASCO MOUND 


PREHISTORIC 


NEW 


I 







Source: Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources, Florida Master Site File, 
1991 and 1998 



Figure 30. Sites in the City of Alachua previously included in the Florida Site File 



34 



When the full survey of Alachua is completed, it would also be appropriate for the City 
to apply for a grant to educate the public concerning historic preservation and the history of 
Alachua. In the past State funds have financed brochures of historic districts. A walking and 
driving tour brochure would be helpful for school children, tourists, and the general public, and 
would strengthen preservation activities in the City. 

Historic Preservation Ordinance 

The single most effective tool necessary to protect historic structures at the local level is 
the passage of an Historic Preservation ordinance to provide the regulatory framework necessary 
to pursue a comprehensive preservation program. Such an ordinance would create an Historic 
Preservation Board or Architectural Review body empowered to locally designate historic sites, 
using the criteria of the National Register. A local historic register is more effective in regulating 
alterations, modifications or demolitions than the National Register, which is more of an 
honorary designation. 

Article Eleven of the City of Alachua Comprehensive Plan, "Historic Sites and 
Structures Preservation Regulations," lays out the framework for designating landmarks, 
landmark sites, and historic districts. Alachua currently designates the city's Planning and 
Zoning Board as its Historic Preservation Agency. 

The Bureau of Historic Preservation in Tallahassee can provide technical advice and 
guidance and sample ordinances. In addition, the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation, a 
statewide partner of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, presents continuing education 
workshops on a number of timely topics including the art of writing and reading preservation 
ordinances, buying and selling property in historic neighborhoods, and documenting historic 
buildings. Visit the Florida Trust's website at www.floridatrast.org for dates, venues, and 
subjects of future workshops. 

Educational Programs 

Historic preservation creates countless educational opportunities for schools, community, 
and the visiting public. A photographic display of some of Alachua's historic buildings has been 
displayed in the Alachua Public Library, and Mrs. Courtney Mitchell, a teacher at Mebane 
Middle School, has worked with her students to create a local history component that can be 
accessed on the internet. A walking tour organized by the Alachua County Historical Society and 
led by local residents drew a large and enthusiastic crowd last year. There are many other ways 
that the knowledge and appreciation of the past can be shown. Contests of art or photography 
that focuses on historic buildings can be sponsored for students, and many young people enjoy 
interviewing pioneer members of the community to learn about the way things were "way back 
when." University and community college students could be offered an opportunity to 
participate in preservation programs through internships, research and fellowships. 

Tours of historic homes sponsored by local organizations are popular in many 
communities as a fund-raising event and have become standbys at annual cultural and heritage 
festivals. Promotional posters and walking-tour brochures are valued by visitors as souvenirs. 
Plaques on homes and stores that record dates of construction and names of the early owners 
recognize pioneer families and merchants. Knowing that a restaurant was once a funeral parlor, a 
grocery, and a five-and- ten-cent store, as the Conestoga's history reveals, intrigues patrons, as 
does the display of historic photographs and a thumbnail sketch of the building's history. 



35 



Workshops and community meetings involving the restoration, maintenance, and 
interpretation of historic buildings; development of design guidelines for alterations and 
modifications of historic buildings; and financial incentives available to property owners would 
provide information to interested individuals. Banners that recognize historic buildings for 
outstanding renovation or restoration or for continuing care and maintenance foster pride and 
encourage others to follow suit. 

Incentives for Historic Preservation 

Federal Protections and Incentives 

The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 declares our national policy of historic 
preservation and provides for an expanded National Register program. Section 106 of this act 
requires that all projects which are federally funded or require a federal license or permit take 
into account the potential impact of the project upon archaeological sites, historic structures or 
other historic resources that are listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic 
Places. The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, established by this act, reviews the 
actions under Section 106 and encourages the various agencies to consider measures that will 
protect historic properties. The Department of Transportation Act of 1966 mandates a national 
policy that special efforts be made to preserve historic sites. The Tax Reform Act of 1986 
provides for a twenty percent federal tax credit for the expenses incurred in the rehabilitation of 
a certified income producing historic structures. In order to qualify, the structures must be listed 
on the National Register or be a contributing structure to a National Register Historic District. 

State of Florida Incentives 

The Historic Preservation Act of 1966 was amended in 1980 to create the Certified Local 
Government (CLG) Program. This Act established a means by which local governments could 
create an Architectural Review Commission, empowered to enforce the municipality's 
preservation ordinance, conduct historic site surveys, and to review and approve all National 
Register nominations. The Commission must include as members professionals in architecture, 
architectural history, and history. The CLG is eligible for matching grants from the State 
Historic Preservation Office to carry out its duties. 

The Historic Preservation Trust Fund was established in 1983 as a depository for 
legislated funds, and as a result of continued legislative support, the State of Florida is currently 
one of the largest investors in historic preservation in the nation. Grants are reviewed by the 
Florida Historic Preservation Advisory Council, awarded by the Secretary of State and 
administered by the Division of Historical Resources, Department of State. In three annual grant 
cycles, funding is provided for acquisition and development, survey and planning, educational 
programs, and the Main Street program. Some of the funds are distributed through a 50/50 
match of in-kind services and cash. Once a year, Special Category funds are available for large 
scale restoration projects. Units of government and registered non-profit organizations are 
eligible to apply. 

Ad Valorem Tax Relief may be made available to owners of historic houses. Florida has 
passed legislation permitting counties to offer property tax abatement to property owners in 
historic districts. 

The Community Redevelopment Act of 1969, amended in 1977, was established to 



36 



improve the growing problem of blighted areas. Tax Increment Financing is used to finance 
redevelopment projects such as those that have already been implemented on Alachua's Main 
Street. Many other Florida cities and towns have used this vehicle to improve slums and blighted 
business districts. The Florida Main Street Program, which operates under the Division of 
Historical Resources, also offers incentives for the revitalization of historic commercial districts. 
Stability and an improved local tax base, as well as protection for those who have already 
invested in downtown, are the payoffs for these programs. 

Local Historic Preservation Protection and Incentives 

In the early 1980s, the City of Alachua took the first steps toward developing a 
Community Redevelopment Plan addressing the Main Street area, engaging both the public and 
private sector. This plan recognized that the downtown area is a showcase of the city's past and a 
source of pride. It also recognized the need for renovation of underutilized or empty stores and 
the need for an organized effort to improve the appearance of the street and provide adequate 
parking. A Tax Increment Financing District was proposed to fund some of these enhancements. 

The Alachua City Commission established a Community Redevelopment Agency as 
authorized by Florida Statutes, Chapter 163, Part III and authorized the Alachua Community 
Redevelopment District in October of 1998. Ordinance O-99-03 also established a Downtown 
Redevelopment Trust Fund and named the six members of the Trust Board . 

Article Eleven of the City of Alachua Land Development Regulations refers to Historic 
Sites and Structures Preservation Regulations. The Planning and Zoning Board serves as the 
Historic Preservation Agency in matters pertaining to the alteration, demolition, relocation and 
new construction of historic buildings, including the procedures for applying for a Certificate of 
Appropriateness. The Agency also can adopt guidelines for changes to designated properties and 
is empowered to recommend the designation of historic districts and individual landmarks and 
landmark sites. 

With the completion of this survey of the Downtown Redevelopment District, the City of 
Alachua has taken another important stride in its plan to protect its historic resources. 



NOTES 

1 Milanich, Jerald T. "Hernando de Soto and the Expedition in Florida" Miscellaneous Project 
Report Number 32, Florida Museum of Natural History, August, 1988, "Spanish Missions of 
Florida" Miscellaneous Project Report Number 39, Florida Museum of Natural History, 
September 1988. 

2. " Newnansville Cemetery," National Register Nomination, 1976; F. W. Buchholz, Alachua 
County, Florida, 1929, p. 59, 90, 108, 153, 

3. Charles Henry "Carl" Weber, Eden of the South, p. 66-71 

4. Jess Davis, History of Alachua County, p. 126. 



37 



5. Gainesville Daily Sun. 10-20-1890, 8-23-1905; Georgia, Florida and Alabama Business 
Directory, 1903. 

6. Gainesville Daily Sun. 8-26-1903; 1-8-1905; 1-10-1905; 10-3-1905; 11-19-1911, 8-27-1912, 
6-19-1913; Florida State Gazetteer and Business Directory, 1 906- 1 907; 1 9 1 1 - 1 9 1 2 

7. Sanborn Maps, Alachua, 1912, 1924, interviews with many pioneer residents of Alachua 

8. Great Bowl of Alachua, Gainesville: Chamber of Commerce, 1926 

9. Gainesville Daily Sun. 5-12-1930, 1-23-1931, 12-27-1931; 8-29-1935 

10. Gainesville Daily Sun 7-4-1931, 7-31-1931, "At Copeland Sausage, They Use Everything 
but the Squeal," Gainesville Sun, 1-17-76 

1 1 . Virginia and Lee McAlester, A Field Guide to American Houses, p. 268. 

12. McAlester, p 454. 



38 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Alachua County, Florida. Gainesville, Chamber of Commerce, 1925. 

Buchholz, F. W. History of Alachua County . St. Augustine: The Record Company, 1929. 

Davis, Jess G. History of Alachua County. Gainesville: Alachua County Historical Society, 
1966. 

Georgia, Florida, and Alabama Business Directory . Washington, DC: State Publishing 
Company, 1903. 

Great Bowl of Alachua, Gainesville: Chamber of Commerce, 1926. 

McAlester, Virginia, and Lee McAlester. A Field Guide to American Houses. New York: Knopf, 
1986. 

Milanich, Jerald T. "Hernando de Soto and the Expedition in Florida" Miscellaneous Project 
Report Number 32, Florida Museum of Natural History, August, 1988. 

Milanich, Jerald T. "Spanish Missions of Florida" Miscellaneous Project Report Number 39, 
Florida Museum of Natural History, September 1988. 

"Newnansville Cemetery," National Register nomination, 1976 

Webber, "Carl" Charles Henry. The Eden of the South New York: Leve & Alden's, 1883 



39 



APPENDIX ONE 

Inventory of Survey Sites 



Site number 


Address 


Name 


Date 


AL3527 


14205 Main Street 




cal930 


AL3528 


14213 Main Street 


Stringer House 


cal930 


AL3529 


14310 Main Street 


VFW Post 9229 


cal900 


AL3530 


14311 Main Street 


Standard Oil Station 


cal930 


AL3531 


14320 Main Street 


Enneis Motor Company 


ca!900 


AL3532 


14507 Main Street 


Masonic Ldg/Williams Store cal900 


AL3533 


14515 Main Street 


Eddy Store 


cal900 


AL3534 


14520 Main Street 


Old Cigar Factory 


cal900 


AL3535 


14521 Main Street 


Sealey Dry Goods 


cal900 


AL3536 


14525 Main Street 


Sealey Dry Goods 


cal900 


AL3537 


14545 Main Street 


Sealey Dry Goods 


cal900 


AL3538 


14565 Main Street 


Alachua Womans Club 


cal938 


AL3539 


14603 Main Street 


Williams-LeRoy House 


1901 


AL3540 


14616 Main Street 


Futch House 


cal900 


AL3541 


14617 Main Street 


David Waters House 


cal900 


AL3542 


14705 Main Street 


Stephens House 


1910 


AL3543 


14706 Main Street 


Bank of Alachua 


1904 


AL3544 


14712 Main Street 


Annie Turner House 


cal900 


AL3545 


14713 Main Street 


Pierce-Bishop House 


1898 


AL3546 


14720 Main Street 


Thigpen House 


1920 


AL3547 


14721 Main Street 


Dr. Goode's Office 


1948 


AL3548 


14815 Main Street 


Old Produce Packing Shed 


cal930 


AL3549 


14822 Main Street 


Stringfellow Building 


cal900 


AL3550 


14823 Main Street 


Consignment Shop 


cal900 


AL3551 


14827 Main Street 


Main Street Equipment 


cal900 


AL3552 


14830 Main Street 


Deer Stand 


cal900 


AL3553 


14838 Main Street 


Ace Hardware 


cal900 


AL3554 


14839 Main Street 


Bejano Furniture 


cal900 


AL3555 


14841 Main Street 


The Connection 


cal900 


AL3556 


14844 Main Street 


Direct Mail Services 


cal900 


AL3557 


14850 Main Street 


Old First National Bank 


1909 


AL3558 


14856 Main Street 


Elite Consignment 


1909 


AL3559 


14862 Main Street 


Burch Antiques 


1909 


AL3560 


14874 Main Street 


Garden Gazebo 


cal910 


AL3561 


14900 Main Street 


Old Movie Theater 


cal910 


AL3562 


14906 Main Street 


Alachua Design Printing 


cal900 


AL3563 


14920 Main Street 


Karate 


cal900 


AL3564 


14925 Main Street 


Book Store 


1898 


AL3565 


14933 Main Street 


Allstate Insurance 


1898 



40 



AL3566 


14940 Main Street 


Conestoga Restaurant 


cal900 


AL3567 


14952 Main Street 


Santa Fe Hair Design 


cal920 


AL3568 


14960 Main Street 


Texas Pete 


1920 


AL3569 


15005 Main Street 


Old Enneis Motor Co. 


cal923 


AL3570 


15310 Main Street 




cal945 


AL3571 


15316 Main Street 


Dr. Bagwell House 


cal935 


AL3572 


15320 Main Street 




cal930 


AL3573 


14009 Peggy Road 




cal930 


AL3574 


14405 Peggy Road 


Florida Machinery Service 


cal935 


AL3575 


14502 NW 138 Terrace 




1945 


AL3576 


14521 NW 138 Terrace 


McCoy-Pettit House 


1935 


AL3577 


14623 NW 140 Street 


Presbyterian Church 


1952 


AL3578 


14706 NW 140 Street 


McCann House 


cal900 


AL3579 


14902 NW 140 Street 


Hinkelman House 


cal929 


A13580 


14707 NW 140 Street 


Bell-Rist House 


cal900 


AL3581 


14805 NW 140 Street 


Alachua Methodist Church 


1912 


AL3582 


14804 NW 140 Street 


Pearson-Braswell House 


cal900 


AL3583 


14818 NW 140 Street 


Bob Wells House 


1941 


AL3584 


14819 NW 140 Street 


Traxler House 


1929 


AL3585 


14825 NW 140 Street 


Swick Realty 


1929 


AL3586 


14816 NW 140 Street 


H.M. Harris House 


1935 


AL3587 


14212 NW 142 Terrace 




cal930 


AL3588 


14402 NW 142 Terrace 


Langford House 


cal920 


AL3589 


14410 NW 142 Terrace 


Eddy House 


cal930 


AL3590 


14520 NW 142 Terrace 


D. S. Waters House 


cal920 


AL3591 


14609 NW 142 Terrace 




1929 


AL3592 


14707 NW 142 Terrace 


Turner House 


1947 


AL3693 


14710 NW 142 Terrace 


Wheeler House 


1938 


AL3694 


14722 NW 142 Terrace 


E.D. Hague House 


1920 


AL3695 


14723 NW 142 Terrace 


Dr. Goode House 


1945 


AL3596 


14801 NW 142 Terrace 


Carl Williams House 


cal939 


AL3597 


14806 NW 142 Terrace 


Futch-Stephens House 


cal920 


AL3598 


14919 NW 142 Terrace 


Alachua Child Care 


cal930 


AL3599 


13820 NW 143 Place 




1940 


AL3600 


14106 NW 143 Place 




1935 


AL3601 


14109 NW 143 Place 


Cato House 


1920 


AL3602 


14502 NW 143 Place 




1927 


AL3603 


14321 NW 144 Place 




cal940 


AL3604 


14409 NW 144 Place 


Duke House 


1929 


AL3605 


14412 NW 144 Place 




1942 


AL3606 


14508 NW 144 Place 




1942 


AL3607 


14602 NW 144 Street 




1929 


AL3608 


14611 NW 144 Street 


Palmer House 


1935 


AL3609 


14620 NW 144 Street 


Loften-Duke House 


1926 



41 



AL3610 


14630 NW 144 Street 


Enneis House 


1930 


AL3611 


14708 NW 144 Street 


Lyman House 


1920 


AL3612 


14717 NW 144 Street 


Fugate House 


cal900 


AL3613 


14810 NW 144 Street 


Dell-Dansby House 


cal900 


AL3614 


14906 NW 144 Street 


Leland Waters House 


1915 


AL3615 


14915 NW 144 Street 


Mott-Reaves House 


1935 


AL3616 


14206 NW 145 Avenue 




cal930 


AL3617 


14323 NW 145 Avenue 




1937 


AL3618 


14403 NW 145 Avenue 


R. L. Wood House 


1915 


AL3619 


14417 NW 145 Avenue 


Dr. Dale House 


1942 


AL3620 


14412 NW 145 Avenue 


Minister's House 


1928 


AL3621 


14421 NW 145 Avenue 


Church of Christ 


1921 


AL3622 


13626 NW 146 Avenue 




1940s 


AL3623 


13917 NW 146 Avenue 


J. Walker House 


cal920 


AL3624 


13921 NW 146 Avenue 


Ernest Spencer House 


cal930 


AL3625 


14109 NW 146 Avenue 


Waters-Powell House 


cal930 


AL3626 


14204 NW 146 Avenue 


Sealey House 


1910 


AL3627 


14216 NW 146 Avenue 


McCullough House 


1929 


AL3628 


14319 NW 146 Avenue 


Dew House 


1929 


AL3629 


14405 NW 146 Avenue 


Joseph Fugate House 


1930 


AL3630 


14013 NW 147 Avenue 


Williams-Enneis House 


1925 


AL3631 


14109 NW 147 Avenue 




1935 


AL3632 


14205 NW 147 Avenue 




1935 


AL3633 


14211-17 NW 147 Ave. 




1944 


AL3634 


14304 NW 147 Avenue 


C.B. Waters House 


1920 


AL3635 


13707 NW 148 Place 


Old Methodist Parsonage 


1911 


AL3636 


13715 NW 148 Place 


Jeffcoat-hague House 


1939 


AL3637 


13805 NW 148 Place 


Hague House 


1929 


AL3638 


13903 NW 148 Place 


Harrison- Johnson House 


1920 


AL3639 


14203 NW 148 Place 




cal935 


AL3640 


14209 NW 148 Place 


Williams-Harrison House 


cal900 


AL3641 


14305 NW 148 Place 


Woodard House 


1945 


AL3648 


14308 NW 148 Place 


Emeiy Williams House 


1928 


AL3649 


14404 NW 148 Place 


Charlie Waters House 


1915 


AL3650 


14416 NW 148 Place 


Baldwin House 


1915 


AL3651 


14712 NW 148 Place 


A. J. Williams House 


1929 


AL3652 


14115 NW 150 Avenue 


Dixon House 


1935 



42 



APPENDIX TWO 

Legal Description of Downtown Redevelopment District 

DOWNTOWN REDEVELOPMENT DISTRICT-CITY OF ALACHUA 

LEGAL DESCRIPTION: 

BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF N.W. 142nd TERRACE AND U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 441 
AND PROCEED SOUTH ALONG N.W. 142nd TERRACE TO N.W. 150th AVENUE; THENCE WEST 
ON N.W. 150th AVENUE TO N.W. 145th TERRACE; THENCE SOUTH ON N.W. 145th TERRACE TO 
N.W. 142nd AVENUE; THENCE EAST ON N.W. 142nd AVENUE TO NW 138th STREET; THENCE 
NORTH ON NW 138th STREET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF BLOCK 44 OF CLARKS 
FIRST ADDITION TO ALACHUA (PLAT BOOK A, PAGE 108), THENCE EAST ALONG SAID 
SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF BLOCK 44 TO NW 137th TERRACE; THENCE NORTH ON NW 137th 
TERRACE TO ITS END AT THE SOUTH LINE OF THE ABANDONED ATLANTIC COASTLINE 
RAILROAD; THENCE WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE OF THE ABANDONED ATLANTIC 
COASTLPNE RAILROAD TO THE BEGINNING OF NW 137th TERRACE RUNNING NORTH; 
THENCE NORTH ON NW 137th TERRACE TO U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 441 ; THENCE WEST ON U.S. 
HIGHWAY NO. 441 TO THE POPNT OF BEGINNING. 

EXCEPT FOR THE FOLLOWING PARCELS: 

A) THE WEST Vz OF BLOCK I OF C.A. WILLIAMS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF 
ALACHUA AS PER PLAT BOOK "C, PAGE 79B OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF 

ALACHUA COUNTY, ALSO KNOWN AS TAX PARCELS 3782-1, 3782-2, 3782-3, 3782, 3784-1, 3784, 
AND 3783. 

B) THE WEST Vz OF BLOCK 4 OF C.A. WILLIAMS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF 
ALACHUA AS PER PLAT BOOK -C, PAGE 79B OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF 

ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ALSO KNOWN AS TAX PARCELS 3792-3, 3792, 3794-2, 3794-1, 
3795, AND 3794. 

C) THE WEST Vi OF BLOCK 5 OF C.A. WILLIAMS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF 
ALACHUA AS PER PLAT BOOK C", PAGE 79B OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF 

ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ALSO KNOWN AS TAX PARCELS 3799, 3801-1, 3802, AND 3801. 

D) LOTS 6 AND 7 AND THE WEST Vz OF LOT 5, BLOCK 8 OF C.A. WILLIAMS ADDITION TO 
THE CITY OF ALACHUA AS PER PLAT BOOK "C", PAGE 79B OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF 
ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ALSO KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 3815. 

D) LOTS 19, 20, 2 1 , AND 22, BLOCK I OF WOODS SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT BOOK "B", 
PAGE 60 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA, KNOWN AS TAX 
PARCELS 3825 AND 3826. 

E) LOTS 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, AND 24, BLOCK 6 OF LYNWOOD PARK AS PER PLAT BOOK 
B', PAGE 73 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA, KNOWN AS TAX 
PARCELS 3846 AND 3884-1. 

F) LOT 3, BLOCK 18 OF TOMPSETTS ADDITION TO ALACHUA AS PER PLAT BOOK -A', PAGE 
68 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 
3721. 

43 



G) THE WEST 70 FEET OF THE SOUTH 90 FEET OF LOT 4, BLOCK 4 OF OLMSTEAD'S SURVEY 
OF THE CITY OF ALACHUA AS PER PLAT BOOK C, PAGE 79B OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF 
ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA, KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 3643-4 

H) LOTS 10, H, AND 12 BLOCK 1 1 OF TOMPSETTS ADDITION TO ALACHUA AS PER PLAT 
BOOK A, PAGE 68 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA 
COUNTY, FLORIDA KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 3692 

I) LOTS 8 AND 9 BLOCK 2 1 OF TOMPSETTS ADDITION TO ALACHUA AS PER 
PLAT BOOK "A", PAGE 68 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, 
FLORIDA KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 3742-1 

J) THE NORTH 25 FEET OF THE SOUTH 60 FEET OF THE WEST 150 FEET OF BLOCK 12 OF 
TOMPSETTS ADDITION TO ALACHUA AS PER PLAT BOOK "A", PAGE 68 OF THE PUBLIC 
RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 3695 
K) BEGINNING AT THE S.W. CORNER OF LOT 2, BLOCK I OF OLMSTEADS SURVEY AS PER 
PLAT BOOK "C", PAGE 79B OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND 
RUN EAST 144 FEET, THENCE NORTH 100 FEET; THENCE WEST 62 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 73 
FEET; THENCE WEST 82 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 27 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING, KNOWN AS 
TAX PARCEL 3610-1 

L) LOTS 8, 9 AND THE SOUTH 10 FEET OF LOT 7 BLOCK 37 OF CLARK'S FIRST ADDITION TO 
ALACHUA AS PER PLAT BOOK H A", PAGE 108 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA 
COUNTY, FLORIDA KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 3434-3 

M) THAT PART OF THE ABANDONED ATLANTIC COASTLINE RAILROAD (200 FOOT RIGHT 
OF WAY) LOCATED NORTH OF BLOCK 37 OF CLARKS'S FIRST ADDITION TO ALACHUA (PLAT 
BOOK 'A, PAGE 108), SOUTH OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 441, EAST OF NW 140th STREET AND 
WEST OF THE LANDS OWNED BY WENDELL LEWIS AND A NORTHERLY PROJECTION OF THE 
WEST LINE OF SAID LANDS OWNED BY WENDELL LEWIS, KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 3376 
N) LOTS 12, 13, AND 14 BLOCK 32 OF CLARKS FIRST ADDITION TO ALACHUA AS PER PLAT 
BOOK "A", PAGE 108 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA KNOWN AS 
TAX PARCEL 3392-1 

0) LOT 3 BLOCK 30 OF CLARKS FIRST ADDITION TO ALACHUA AS PER PLAT 
BOOK A', PAGE 108 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA KNOWN AS 
TAX PARCEL 3385-2 

P) LOTS 1,2, AND THE EAST 28.32 FEET OF LOT 3 BLOCK 28 OF TOMPSETTS SURVEY AS PER 
PLAT BOOK C, PAGES 79B AND 79C OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, 
FLORIDA KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 3428 

Q) THE EAST 100 FEET OF BLOCK 44 OF CLARKS FIRST ADDITION TO ALACHUA AS PER 
PLAT BOOK 'A, PAGE 108 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA 
KNOWN AS TAX PARCELS 3438-1 AND 3438-2. 

R) THE EAST Vz OF BLOCK 43 OF CLARKS FIRST ADDITION TO ALACHUA AS PER PLAT 
BOOK A, PAGE 108 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA, KNOWN AS 
TAX PARCELS 3436 AND 3436-1 

S) LOTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 13, 14, 15, AND 16 BLOCK 42 AND THE SOUTH Vz OF THE CLOSED STREET 
LOCATED IMMEDIATELY NORTH OF LOTS 1, 2, 3, AND 4 OF CLARKS FIRST ADDITION TO 
ALACHUA AS PER PLAT BOOK A ", PAGE 108 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA 
COUNTY, FLORIDA, KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 3420 

T) THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE 
INTERSECTION OF NW 137th TERRACE AND U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 441 BEING LEASED BY LEWIS 
OIL COMPANY FROM BLANCHE LEROY LEASE RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK 1600, 
PAGE 1413 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA KNOWN AS TAX 



44 



PARCEL 3367-1 

U) Commence at the intersection of the Southerly right of way line of the abandoned Atlantic Coastline 
Railroad with the Westerly line of Block 19 of Downings Addition to the City of Alachua, as per plat 
recorded in Plat Book "C", pages 79, 79 A, 79B, and 79C of the public records of Alachua County, Florida 
for the point of reference and run S.55'56'00"E., along said Southerly right of way line, a distance of 10.02 
feet to a concrete monument on the Easterly right of way line of NW 1st Street and the True Point of 
Beginning; thence continue S.55'56'00"E., along said Southerly right of way line, a distance of 208.17 feet 
to a steel rod and cap; thence run N.33'38'30"E., a distance of 172.51 feet to a steel rod and cap on the 
Southerly right of way line of State Road No. 25 (A.K.A. U.S. Highway No. 441); thence run 
N.55'56'00'W. , along said Southerly right of way line, a distance of 28 1 .79 feet to a concrete monument at 
the beginning of a curve concave Southeasterly, said curve having a radius of 27.53 feet; thence run 
Southwesterly, with said curve, through an arc angle of 127'02'15' an arc distance of 61.04 feet (chord 
bearing and distance of S.60032'33*W., 49.29 feet respectively) to a concrete monument at the end of said 
curve, thence run S.02'58'15"E., along the aforementioned Easterly right of way line of NW 1st Street, a 
distance of 160.83 feet to the True Point of Beginning, containing 1.063 acres more or less, known as tax 
parcel 3595-200-1. 

END OF EXCLUDED PARCELS 

ALSO: 

THAT PART OF THE ABANDONED ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD RIGHT OF WAY 
LOCATED NORTH OF AND ADJACENT TO CLARKS SECOND ADDITION TO ALACHUA BEING 
125 FEET NORTH AND SOUTH MEASUREMENT AND 652.70 FEET EAST AND WEST 
MEASUREMENT BEING OWNED BY THE STATE OF FLORIDA AND USED AS A DEPARTMENT 
OF TRANSPORTATION STORMWATER DRAINAGE BASIN, KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 3376-1 

ALSO: 

THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND BEING BOUNDED ON THE EAST BY NW 142nd TERRACE, 
BOUNDED ON THE SOUTH BY NW 150th AVENUE, BOUNDED ON THE NORTH BY U.S. 
HIGHWAY NO. 441, AND BOUNDED ON THE WEST BY THE NORTHERLY PROJECTION OF NW 
145th TERRACE, LESS THAT PART CONTAINED WITHIN THE STATE OF FLORIDA DRAINAGE 
BASIN, KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 3605-1 

ALSO: 

COMMENCE 295.4 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE S.E. 1/4 OF THE S.E. 1/4 
OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST, ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING 
ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE RAILROAD RIGHT OF WAY; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG 
SAID RAILROAD RIGHT OF WAY, A DISTANCE OF 360 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; 
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTHWESTERLY, ALONG SAID RAILROAD RIGHT OF WAY, A 
DISTANCE OF 420 FEET; THENCE N.35W., A DISTANCE OF 267.12 FEET TO THE SOUTH RIGHT 
OF WAY LINE OF SEABOARD AIRLINE RAILROAD; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY, ALONG SAID 
RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 410. 18 FEET; THENCE S.35'E., A DISTANCE OF 140. 1 
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 3535-3. 

ALSO: 



45 



BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION NW 154th PLACE AND U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 
441 AND PROCEED EAST ON NW 154th PLACE TO NW 142nd TERRACE; 
THENCE SOUTH ON NW 142nd TERRACE TO NW 154th AVENUE; THENCE 

EAST ON NW 154th AVENUE TO NW 141st STREET; THENCE SOUTH ON NW 141st STREET TO 
NW 152nd PLACE; THENCE EAST ON NW 152nd PLACE TO NW 140th STREET; THENCE SOUTH 
ON NW 140th STREET TO U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 441; THENCE WEST ON U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 441 
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. 

EXCEPT FOR THE FOLLOWING PARCELS: 

A) 

LOTS 15 AND 16 BLOCK 9 OF GUINN, WILLIAMS, AND REEVES ADDITION TO ALACHUA AS 
PER PLAT BOOK C, PAGE 79A OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA 
KNOWN AS TAX PARCELS 3584 AND 3584-1 B) LOT 2 AND THE NORTH Vz OF LOT 3 BLOCK 14 
OF GUINN, WILLIAMS, AND REEVES ADDITION AS PER PLAT BOOK "C", PAGE 79A OF THE 
PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 3591 C) THAT 
PART OF LOT I BLOCK 14 OF GUINN, WILLIAMS, AND REEVES ADDITION AS PER PLAT BOOK 
"C", PAGE 79A OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA NOT PREVIOUSLY 
DEEDED OUT TO JOIN WITH LAND IMMEDIATELY TO THE SOUTH, KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 
3591-1 END OF EXCLUDED PARCELS 

ALSO: 

COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 18 
EAST, ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA FOR THE POINT OF REFERENCE AND RUN S.00054WE., 
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 14, A DISTANCE OF 2201.84 FEET TO THE 
INTERSECTION OF SAID WEST LINE WITH THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE 
ATLANTIC COASTLINE HIGH SPRINGS TO ROCHET IE TRACK (A.K.A. ABANDONED 
SEABOARD COASTLINE RAILROAD); THENCE RUN S.54'00'00"E., A DISTANCE OF 129.00 FEET; 
THENCE RUN N.36'00'00E., A DISTANCE OF 89.99 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE 
NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 441 AND THE TRUE POINT OF 
BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE N.36'00'00 , E., A DISTANCE OF 222.01 FEET TO A CONCRETE 
MONUMENT; THENCE RUN N.54'00'00"W., A DISTANCE OF 170.34 FEET TO A STEEL ROD AND 
CAP; THENCE RUN S.83024WW., A DISTANCE 1 14.62 FEET TO A DRILL HOLE IN CONCRETE 
ON THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 235; THENCE RUN S.00054'00"E., 
ALONG SAID EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 197.61 FEET TO A DRILL HOLE IN 
CONCRETE ON THE AFOREMENTIONED NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 
NO. 441 ; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE WITH A CURVE 
CONCAVE NORTHEASTERLY, SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 3480.83 FEET THROUGH 
AN ARC ANGLE OF 02015'03", AN ARC DISTANCE OF 

136.74 FEET (CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF S.59-4223-E., 136.73 FEET 
RESPECTIVELY) TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 46,439 
SQUARE FEET MORE OR LESS. KNOWN AS TAX PARCEL 3226-1 



46 









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